More Press for Bad Faith

owhIt’s nearly been a month since Bad Faith was released. I’ll have some photos from the book tour posted here before long, as it’s been an exciting month of travel to get out and talk to as many people as possible about my first book. After 17 out of 30 days spent on the road, in 12 different cities around the Midwest and both coasts for 11 readings and events, some family vacation mixed in along the way, it’s nice to be home in content exhaustion. I met and reconnected with so many great friends and booksellers along the way, the last month was a real privilege. More on this soon.

In the meantime, here’s a gaggle of links to press the book has received.

The Rumpus said that “Bad Faith builds a world that exists for its own purposes. The collection is interspersed with vignettes that lead like breadcrumbs from the opening piece to the last. The finale, also titled ‘Bad Faith,’ unfolds in a three-part structure, guiding us back around to the beginning and answering the question that has been on our mind since page 23. It ties the whole collection together and ends the book on a different—and more intriguing note—than it opened on. To say more would be to spoil the treat. Suffice it to say that if a novel is meant to end with a sense of opening out, then this collection leaves us eager for more of Wheeler’s dark, quiet world.”

The New Territory said that, “In Bad Faith, Theodore Wheeler’s debut collection of short stories, it is certainty that causes trouble. Ideas become boundaries, lines any reasonable person might draw for him or herself: beliefs in who they are or were, that what they’re doing is the best thing for them. Marriages, homes, children, careers. And yet here, at the borders of identity and place, is where Wheeler makes his incision.”

Fiction Advocate says that “Wheeler’s characters are hopeless but resolute, savvy and unremorseful. They face the world head on, acknowledging its ugliness and its dark side. Like Rodney, we readers remain alert to the presence of danger and death—the entire collection hints of it. Yet as the title suggests, this is a promise made in bad faith. Wheeler makes us think we know what will happen, and from what direction the danger will come, only to show us just how mistaken we are.”

Blue River literary journal interviewed me on their blog, posing 10 questions about the writing life after grad school and my path to publishing books. I’m not sure how insightful my responses are, but I did my best. Here’s a sample: “Like a sea turtle, those first few steps outside the shell can be treacherous, but I didn’t have to explain to anyone why I was still writing and that was tremendous. Not that there haven’t been a lot of bumps along the way. Having some success to point to never hurts, though.”

The Daily Iowan previewed my reading at Prairie Lights, saying that “Wheeler, who also works as a reporter covering civil law, takes a different approach to the concept of belief in his début, Bad Faith.”

The Omaha World-Herald featured a few quotes from me about local bookstore The Bookworm (along with the above photo) and earlier gave a preview of Bad Faith in its Bookends section with a nod to my forthcoming novel.

And Akademie Schloss Solitude very generously featured an excerpt from Bad Faith on it’s Schloss Post web portal.

Also, we’re doing a Goodreads Book Giveaway. Please stop by and enter if you’re on Goodreads.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Bad Faith by Theodore Wheeler

Bad Faith

by Theodore Wheeler

Giveaway ends August 31, 2016.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

 

The Rumpus Interviews Vivian Lee

vivian-lee-alt-2-2809-200x200Over the weekend The Rumpus featured an interview with Vivian Lee, my editor at Little A. In addition to a shout out for Kings of Broken Things (coming in August 2017 from Little A) and some hilarious recollections of how the Pizza Hut Book-It program spurred on a lifetime of reading and a career as an editor, the space gives a glimpse of Vivian’s take on race and publishing. After getting together last Thursday at AWP in an L.A. ping-pong bar, I couldn’t be more excited to be working with Vivian and the Little A team on this book. This interview provides some insight as to why I’m so enthusiastic.

Be sure to check out the full interview. Here are a couple highlights:

Rumpus: I love how unapologetically blunt some of your tweets are when it comes to race. Like this one: “This may come as a surprise but the onus is not just on POC editors to acquire books by writers of color (esp bc there are so few of us).” What’s your MO as an editor?

Lee: When I tweeted that, it was because someone made a passing comment about how I could be known as the editor who only publishes Asian American authors. It was so othering to me. It made it seem like the only reason I was publishing authors was because we had a similar background. I’d like to think I’m publishing quality books—and it just so happens that a lot of these writers are of Asian descent. If it is a good narrative with an emotional core, then it’s a good book.

As far as my MO as an editor, I am interested in the beauty and transformational power of language and a good story and that’s what I gravitate towards. My list is predominantly writers of color mostly because I’m surrounded by wonderful communities of them and I want to be able to go to more readings and panels that aren’t comprised of all white or almost all white writers. I think I’m in a very good position at Little A as an editor of color to publish these voices and experiences that are not often heard. It’s a unique place to be in and it’s something I take very seriously.

Rumpus: What’s at the root of the diversity problem in publishing? What do you think needs to change?

Lee: There’s a lot of hand-wringing over the “diversity problem” but not a lot being done yet. I think the root of the problem goes back to my tweet earlier. Everyone in publishing needs to take accountability for diversity—not just POC editors. From the ground up we have to hire diverse editors, designers, marketers, publicists, etc. I do think once we change from the “inside out,” then publishing will realize that Junot Díaz, Zadie Smith, etc don’t have to be the sole voice of an entire group of people. I can’t speak for other houses, but I am excited to say that Little A is committed to publishing diverse stories, voices, and authors.

In my dream scenario as an editor, if we all seek out more writers of color and diversify our list, then agents will have to also diversify their list and seek out more writers of color, and readers will get more of a chance to read stories they normally wouldn’t read, and then more books by writers of color will be published. I’m pretty direct with agents about what books I want and it forces them to look at their own list and see where they can improve.